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Glassdoor Rankings Got you Down? Your Absolute Next Steps to Better Rankings

{{ excerpt(`Negative rankings on Glassdoor have a host of potential consequences for your business. With the ease of accessing information on this platform and the on the internet in general, a few bad reviews could steer the strongest candidates away from your company. Such reviews might even make current employees question they want to stay with the business in the long term. Instead of allowing these negative ratings to sour your company's reputation, implement some techniques to bolster your company's rating and how it is viewed on the internet.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Identify the Issues</span></h2>Ultimately, you want to craft a plan that targets the specific issues cited against your company. In order to identify those issues, you'll need to conduct some research. On Glassdoor, investigate to see what the most commonly cited complaints are. If past employees note a number of issues with pay, you may need to reevaluate this element. On the other hand, if numerous employees are writing about problems with the human resources department, workshops to help enhance skills here can assist. <a href="http://perknow.com/insights" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">Distributing anonymous surveys</a> to current workers can also lead your help to discover what the most pressing problems are. Some of the most popular tools for this are TINYpulse, Officevibe and CultureAmp.&nbsp;<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Address the Problems</span></h2>Figuring out why people are complaining about your business is important, but you also must work on resolving these issues to make any sort of major change in the company. Once you have identified why people are complaining about your business, you and your team members can evaluate whether you can reasonably resolve this issue and to what extent. Keep in mind that you may discover more than one pressing problems. One approach for tackling this issue is to assign different teams to each problem and have regularly meetings to assess the progress of each unit.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Evaluate the Competition</span></h2>One main reason why you want to have a high review on Glassdoor is to attract the best workers to come to your company with their skills. If these individuals are looking at your company's Glassdoor rankings, they are also likely to review the rankings of your competitors to see which business is the right fit for them. Therefore, you must know what your competitors' rankings are. Take a look at their Glassdoor listings to see if they have more positive or negative reviews than you. While you do still want to resolve your company's own negative issues, you also want to place emphasis on staying ahead of the competitors. If your business is already the highest ranked one in the field, you can at least relax a little.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Resolve Employee Turnover</span></h2>A high employee turnover rate is a major problem because it signifies multiple issues with your business. People on the job hunt, when seeing the turnover rate at your business, may assume that workers tend to use your job as a starter job. Once they have gained experience in the field, they move on to a position that they view as better. This cycle can keep continuing. A high turnover rate can also indicate that the job conditions are poor and that the owners and managers aren't making the environment an attractive one to stay in for the long term. During the analysis phase, focus attention on this element to determine how high the turnover rate is and why people are leaving at that rate.<strong><div data-empty="true"><br></div><h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Examine Pay Rates, Benefits and Vacations</span></h2></strong>If you're getting negative reviews on Glassdoor, chances are that some of the problems may pertain to pay rates, benefits and vacations. While many individuals do pursue careers that they love, they also need to take into account the fact that they must provide necessities for themselves and their family members. Staying at a job that doesn't allow for the purchasing of these provisions is simply impossible. When instantly bolstering all of these elements at once isn't possible, make a plan to do so over the course of the next several years. Once you have the specifics worked out, you can let workers know what to expect. When they are aware that they will earn raises, more vacation days or better benefits in the future, they may very well feel more positive attitudes toward your company.<strong><div data-empty="true"><br></div></strong><strong><span style="font-size: 18px;">Incentivize Work</span></strong><br><br>Again, your workers need to know that their basic needs are covered and that they have enough money to enjoy life. They also want to feel appreciated for their work, and they want to know that their managers see the effort that they put in. One way to let your team members know how much you appreciate their efforts is to create an incentive program. How exactly you approach this program depends upon the model of your business. For example, if your team members set monthly sales goals for themselves, you can offer incentives when they reach a certain number of sales.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Increase Social Opportunities and Experiences</span></h2>In addition to ensuring that your workers are properly compensated, you also want them to feel comfortable at work. Promoting opportunities for social engagement can establish this vibe. You might want to start hosting corporate happy hours, or you could offer an extended lunch break one day per week. These types of experiences allow your workers to bond with one another, which can lead to increased positive vibes about the workplace and increased positive reviews.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Ask for Reviews</span></h2>When your internet reputation is soured by reviews from individuals who haven't work at the company in years or even decades, your business isn't necessarily getting a fair chance. Reviving the page with fresh content from current team members adds an attractive appeal. This information updates your Glassdoor page so that the content isn't stagnant, and it also gives interested parties a look at what's going on at your business in the here and now. Instead of mulling over material from years ago and wondering if it's still relevant, prospective team members can gain a strong sense of what it's like to work for your company today.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Have a Presence</span></h2>Entirely resolving negative issues when it comes to your Glassdoor rankings might seem impossible, but you can actually take important steps to do so. One strategy to use involves actually responding to negative reviews. Responding to negative reviews has a few benefits. This process allows both current and potential workers to see that you scan the page, which can help them to better understand that you do care about resolving issues. Also, this approach lets visitors to the site know that you have the tools and methods available at your job to address problems. For example, if an employee has a specific complaint about job satisfaction, you can then write in your response what this individual can do to resolve the problem. Responding to negative reviews allows you to tell your side of the story. While you don't want to ramble endlessly, whine or attack the writer, you can infuse your perspective of the situation into your response. You can also let writers know if the company is currently working on making any of the changes that they suggest in their reviews.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>Seeing low ratings on Glassdoor is startling to any business owner. Even when your ratings aren't terribly low, you might still not have scores as high as your competitors. Ultimately, assessing where you stand on Glassdoor and how workers perceive your business is important regardless of the situation. Only through this type of assessment can you learn how to improve your company and to attract brilliant minds to come work for you in the future. Harnessing clever and creative tools can help you in achieving these important goals.<div data-empty="true"><br></div><strong>Sources:</strong><br>https://smallbusiness.chron.com/rewards-incentives-workplace-11236.html<br>https://www.forbes.com/sites/ryanerskine/2017/08/28/a-6-step-blueprint-to-improve-your-glassdoor-rating/#17e3e760126c`) }} ...

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Employee Engagement: It's More Than a Ping Pong Table or Free Soda

{{ excerpt(`Once upon a time, workers came for a job and stayed for a career, which made retention rather easy for employers. It wasn’t uncommon for baby boomer and gen-x workers to spend their entire work life with just a couple of employers. Today, millennials are the most populous generation in the workforce, outnumbering baby boomers by over three million, and they operate quite differently than their predecessors.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>Whereas previous generations found the task of searching and applying for a new job, learning a new manager and tasks, and fitting in with new coworkers a daunting task, millennials aren’t afraid of such changes and efforts to professionally advance themselves. They demand employee engagement and employee recognition, and they aren’t afraid to job hop until they find that perfect fit. If your company isn’t offering that path, then you’re likely losing a significant amount of invaluable workers to more astute competitors.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>My college roommate is a perfect example of the millennial worker’s mindset. She found her “dream job” immediately after graduation. Despite college debt, purchasing her first home, and other debts, she informed her boss she was quitting her job because she felt unengaged in almost every aspect of it. She’s only been there two years, and it’s a position that the company will dedicate thousands of dollars and hundreds of hours to refill.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>The Education Advisory board recently found that millennials change jobs up to 20 times in their professional careers, which is twice as much as the average baby boomer employee. A Forbes article highlighted how less than 30 percent of millennial workers plan to stay with their job for at least five years, and 74 percent plan to quit their jobs within the next three years. So, what has today’s workforce so fickle, and what can employers do to solve the retention problem? Let’s explore.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Show Me The Value, Not The Ping-Pong Table&nbsp;</span></h2>Cofounder and CEO of Podium Eric Rea thinks the problem centers on employee engagement factors, which is a thought that echoed exactly what the roommate reasoned as she decided to quit her job. Studies show that millennials don’t just want a paycheck. Instead, they feel the need to be connected to their professional role and its worldly impact. Today’s workers want to be challenged, fulfilled, engaged, and be free to explore innovative ideas and concepts that make a difference.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>The disconnect between what millennial workers want and are getting professionally is demonstrated by a Clutch study that found up to 40 percent of millennials were seeking alternative job opportunities because they felt disengaged and unfulfilled in their current work situation. BambooHR Director Cassie Whitlock says that employers must create compelling opportunities and experiences to retain millennial workers in today’s job marketplace.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>Those retention efforts don’t equate to a smorgasbord of free snacks, gaming tables, PTO extravaganzas, and other ‘fun’ company culture tactics. Such might’ve been the way to the hearts of the tech boom employees working at Facebook and such, but it simply doesn’t translate to the bulk of the millennial workforce seeking a more meaningful company culture in the job marketplace as a whole.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Employers Must Earn, Not Bribe, Workforce Retention&nbsp;</span></h2>Kodiak Cakes senior communications manager Allison Brown, a millennial herself, explains how long-term loyalty from millennial workers must be earned, not bought and bribed. Her ideal company sets a clear growth path and empowers workers to follow it. This, she explains, is how she can know where she’s working is helping her achieve her professional goals.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>An Instructure survey finding that up to 90 percent of millennials are looking to grow their careers within their current employment and that training and development opportunities would deter them from seeking alternative employment opportunities backs up Brown’s take on why candy-coated benefits just don’t cut it with the bulk of today’s workforce. Workers are no longer content with being stagnant in the same position. They want to learn advanced skill sets and to clearly see opportunities for growth and advancement upon their horizons.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>The days of distracting workers from career goals with sideline fun and games are done. This is a workforce laser focused on results. Rea is ensuring the growth demand of <a href="http://podium.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">Podium’s</a> workforce, which happens to be 80 percent millennials, is met via educational and advancement opportunities structured around public speaking, mentorship, building personal brand, career advancement, innovative thinking, and so forth.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>Other companies are following a similar path to attract and retain a professionally hungry, eager, and agile millennial workforce. From educational reimbursement to promoting internal hires first, managers are starting to aim at the right employee recognition and employment engagement efforts to more successfully align employee goals with employer benefits so that millennials can stay, develop, and succeed within their company.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Forget The Free Diet Vanilla Coke And Give Your Workforce Growth Opportunities</span><strong>&nbsp;</strong></h2>As mentioned above, millennials value knowing they’re being productive both in their own careers and from a worldly perspective. This is growth, and a huge part of the equation is receiving quality feedback from management. One study found that 72 percent of millennial workers who received regular managerial feedback were more satisfied and fulfilled by their job. That’s a huge HR productivity point.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>Note that the keyword above is regular. Many companies start new hires off with routine assessments and feedback sessions, but, as the worker shows proficiency, the feedback dwindles to become less frequent to nonexistent. This recipe leaves all workers free to ponder if their work is valuable, good, or even matters. Now, this doesn’t mean that managers should be micromanaging or overly involved in day-to-day tasks, but frequent guidance and constructive feedback are critical points in keeping workers from feeling devalued, mediocre, and unimportant and thus seeking employment in a more positive environment.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>In fact, many millennial workers say that they actually crave constructive criticism from direct supervisors and managers to feel empowered to continually improve in their own roles and avoid employment-stifling stagnation. So what’s the perfect balance between micromanaging and quality feedback?<div data-empty="true"><br></div>According to Qualtrics, workers should generally have weekly feedback opportunities from management. Do keep in mind this should be adjusted based on management style, the pace and significance of the company’s industry, and the comfort expressed by various team members.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>The main takeaway here is for companies to develop their own hybrid feedback model that supplements traditional formal annual reviews. More in-depth discussions about long-term goals and overall performance can be reserved for the semi-annual/ annual reviews. Meanwhile, HR professionals and managers can initiate an ‘in the moment’ feedback system to address daily, weekly, and monthly productivity so that workers aren’t left to wonder about performance and value.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Change Your Company Culture To Attract And Retain Today’s Workforce&nbsp;</span></h2>Seeing how millennials have changed the dynamics of employment behaviors, gen-x workers aren’t exactly following the long-term employment footsteps of the baby boomer generation. Today’s workforce is unapologetic and fearless about seeking the best employment that offers them meaningful advancement within the big picture of life, not trivial perks like ping pong and free sodas. They’re fickle, and that leaves a huge workforce sustainability problem for managers.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>The bottom line is that to attract and retain today’s workforce HR managers and directors must be focused on adding real value to the work environment by ensuring their workforce stays engaged, finds fulfillment, has advancement and growth opportunities, and receives the feedback and measures to know it all matters. Otherwise, these high-value employees will seek those big picture benefits elsewhere, and you’ll be left wasting countless resources and losing precious productivity as you continually refill positions left vacant by workers who’ve moved on to help advance your competitor’s business.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>Do you want to know more about how to initiate a positive company culture to attract and retain valuable employees? <a href="https://www.nectarhr.com">Nectar </a>offers a suite of products to implement employee recognition, perks, and purse surveys to bring meaningful changes to both your company and its workforce.`) }} ...

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Are Traditional Employee Surveys Obsolete?

{{ excerpt(`Capturing employee engagement data with traditional surveys may have been popular several years ago, but these days, they are gradually becoming a thing of the past. One of the problems with formal surveys is that they are not always effective in gauging how employees feel about their jobs in the workplace. As companies try to navigate the increasing complexity of the business world, it is paramount that they shorten the feedback loop between frontline employees and leadership. Our company, PerkNow, has developed an innovative pulse survey tool that will shake up the way employee surveys are taken to produce more accurate employee engagement data for your organization.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Statistics Showing The Decline Of Formal Employee Surveys</span><strong>&nbsp;</strong></h2>While formal surveys are not necessarily extinct, they are clearly on the decline. Here are some statistics that show an increasingly amount of companies are using employee engagement data beyond large, scale surveys.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>-As compared to 89 percent in 2015, experts believe that 74 percent of companies will still use formal, large scale surveys in 2019.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>-According to research performed by Gartner, roughly 59 percent of companies are expected to use engagement data from sources other than traditional surveys in 2019.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>-Among companies that don’t use traditional, formal surveys, nearly 64 percent of them use small-scale pulse surveys and topic specific surveys to assess employee engagement.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>-By 2020, Gartner predicts that approximately 63 percent of organizations will use annual employee surveys and 80 percent will use other employee monitoring data.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>Since formal surveys are slowly declining, there needs to be a better way to obtain a more holistic ‘voice of the employee.’ Although many companies still use survey software like Google Forms, some human resources executives, C-Suite executives, and managers often do not know the appropriate questions to ask their employees or the right way to measure and create actionable data with the responses.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">The Definition Of A Pulse Survey</span></h2>In many cases, a pulse survey can replace formal surveys. Typically based on the same employee engagement model as the annually survey, the pulse survey features a subset of questions that are sent to a specific group of employees. Contrary to annual surveys, these types of surveys allow for frequent measurement from a smaller group of employees.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Introducing A New Way Of Capturing Employee Engagement Data</span></h2>Our innovative <a href="http://perknow.com/insights" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">pulse survey tool</a> enables companies to capture real-time insights from their employees, which will ultimately shorten the feedback loop. Developed by human resources thought leaders, the tool’s preset question hub allows you to select how frequently you would like to send the survey campaigns. The surveys can be sent to your employees weekly, every two weeks, or monthly.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>After you select the frequency of the survey campaigns, the software will automatically send employees relevant questions. The questions are typically based on key engagement drivers, and they are scored on a 5-point scale. The software is designed to calculate a global employee engagement score in real time on the average of the key engagement driver scores.<div data-empty="true"><br></div>All of the pulse questions that are sent to employees contain four questions and a free response. The responses will be anonymous so that the employees are safe to provide honest feedback, instead of voicing their concerns on external platforms like <a href="http://glassdoor.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">Glassdoor</a>. To ensure that you can resolve issues quickly, the tool is equipped with an inbox where you can respond to the free response comments in a private, two-way chat.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">The Importance Of ‘Voice-Of-The-Consumer’ Initiatives</span><strong>&nbsp;</strong></h2>Many companies are using pulse surveys as part of a voice-of-the-consumer or VoC initiative. Along with pulse surveys, VoC initiatives may include sentiment analytics, social network analysis, feedback channels, and social recognition. The primary goal of these concepts is to create a more holistic voice of the employee or VOE.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">Menu Of Choices To Produce VOE (Voice-Of-The-Employee)</span></h2><h3><em><span style="font-size: 14px;">The Annual/Biannual Survey:</span></em><span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;</span></h3><span style="font-size: 14px;">Known</span> as a robust tool for effectively measuring employee engagement, the annual/biannual survey can be used to determine what employees think about a company, but not necessarily why employees think the way they do.<h3><em><span style="font-size: 14px;">The Pulse Survey:</span></em><span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;</span></h3>A pulse survey features the same employee engagement model as the annual survey. One of the main differences between the two is that a pulse survey will deliver a subset of questions to a subset of employees.<h3><em><span style="font-size: 14px;">Social Analytic Tools:</span></em><span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;</span></h3>These tools are designed to analyze the relationship and work patterns among employees through social networks, emails, and employee interactions.<br><h3><em><span style="font-size: 14px;">Employee Sentiment Analysis:</span></em><span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;</span></h3>Sentiment analytics have been shown to analyze employee engagement through their everyday activities including emails, texting, social discussion threads, and surveys.<h2><span style="font-size: 18px;">A Great Pulse Survey Tool Is Definitely The Answer&nbsp;</span></h2>A great pulse survey tool is not only necessary for shortening the feedback loop, it’s also important when your goal is to build a culture where the employee feels heard. When employees feel free to voice their concerns, they are more likely to stay with the company, and the overall morale of an organization will be greatly enhanced. The good news is that our new survey tool, PerkNow is now available so you will be able to shorten the feedback loop between frontline employees and leadership. We offer this tool at half the cost of our competitors (CultureAmp, Officevibe,Glint, TINYpulse).`) }} ...

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